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How the Chickens are Raised


Read the Red Bird Farms label to see that it's antibiotic free chicken.  It's raised cage free and without hormones or steroids.  The chickens are healthy, safe, and clean.  Antibiotic free Red Bird Farms chicken is the way to go!

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How the Chickens are Raised


Read the Red Bird Farms label to see that it's antibiotic free chicken.  It's raised cage free and without hormones or steroids.  The chickens are healthy, safe, and clean.  Antibiotic free Red Bird Farms chicken is the way to go!

The Red Bird breed.

The Cobb Hubbard hybrid offers great flavor, consistency as well as a docile attitude. You might think that farmers pick this sweet breed only for its charming personality, but the taste can’t be beat!

 

How are Red Bird chickens raised?

Red Bird flocks joyously roam spacious barns with an unlimited access to feed and water. They enjoy ventilated housing and soft bedding of wood shavings and rice hulls. Chicken growers work to promote natural behaviors in controlled environments. The goal is to raise healthy, wholesome birds. Rest easy, poultry patrons, as factory farming techniques have flown the coop.

Vegetarian fed: Although Red Bird employees love to eat chicken, we prefer our chickens eat grains. That’s not to say we think everybody should be a vegetarian: only our flocks! Our commitment to the food revolution starts at the source so we keep chicken feed simple, pure, and meat-free.

What’s on the chickens’ plate? 90% of Red Bird’s antibiotic free meal is made up of corn and soy. The final 10% is composed of added nutrients, enzymes, essential oils and vitamins. These include phosphate, limestone and a generous mixture of vegetable oils that holds it all together. Oddly enough, it tastes like granola!

 

Healthy chicks means no medicine!

Red Bird Farms live production focuses highly on new world techniques to defend against potentially harmful substances. Many advancements in poultry production have been based around feed additives and genetic improvements. Red Bird questioned this “progression” and agrees that feeding the world may be a challenge but adding potentially harmful substances to the foods we eat is the wrong approach. Our goal, in bringing you wholesome food, is achieved by being proactive when it comes to animal health. Red Bird Farms is committed to grow out standards that minimize harmful bacteria before they start. These standards include: thorough wash downs between flocks, complete traceability from laying hen to chick, constant monitoring of feed conversions and applying natural advancements to the animals life that benefit health. With these strict growing standards, you can rest assured that what goes into your body was grown with care and attention.

 

Raised without the use of antibiotics

Raised without the use of antibiotics and fed no animal byproducts, ever. These buzz words have been emerging on menus and storefronts. It’s become such an important issue that politicians, schools, and news networks have all taken notice: we don’t want antibiotics in our food! As consumers become hungry for honest, safe, and healthy products, Red Bird Farms has been happy to serve it. In a world full of junk, we are proud to offer this select, anti-biotic free poultry. If you don’t see Red Bird Farms at your local grocer, bug the butcher, for health’s sake!  *always read the label to see if a product is antibiotic free

Can antibiotics affect me? This question is centered on the assumption that the food chickens eat can harm your health. Although these antibiotics can surely get into your system, the greater threat is that many bacterias are growing stronger thanks to over exposure to antibiotics. Red Bird believes that a world with overused antibiotics is damaging to human health. We want our antibiotics to work when we need them!

What are some of the resistant bacteria and antibiotics generally found in the poultry world? Generally speaking, common bacteria that can resist antibiotics are E. Coli and Salmonella. Five antibiotics that are regularly used in the poultry industry are; bacitracin, virginamycin, flavomycin, sulfaquimoxaline and penicillin. So, join the revolution and be free of these potentially harmful substances. Red Bird Farms highly recommends that you speak with your physician about the use of antibiotics in poultry and how they can affect you. The opinion of antibiotics in poultry, by Red Bird Farms, is strictly an opinion and should not be used when making a decision for your health.

Are red Bird chickens given any hormones or steroids?

Red Bird chickens are never given any hormones or steroids. Federal regulations prohibit the use of hormones.

Are Red Bird chickens free range?

Although our chickens are allowed plenty of space and are raised cage-free, they are not certified free range.

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Kitchen Safety


Red Bird Farms chicken is tasty and juicy, but it's still important that it's handled properly.  In order to avoid cross contamination and keep your family safe, follow these kitchen safety guidelines.

Kitchen Safety


Red Bird Farms chicken is tasty and juicy, but it's still important that it's handled properly.  In order to avoid cross contamination and keep your family safe, follow these kitchen safety guidelines.

Here at Red Bird Farms, the kitchen is the most popular room at the office. All employees love to eat, and we’ve found that many of our best ideas and brain storming takes place in this room. Unfortunately, the kitchen is also the place where food safety can be the most at jeopardy.

We want to help your family stay well fed and healthy.

Cook chicken to 165° Fahrenheit (use a thermometer to measure internal temperature). A good oven temperature to roast a chicken is between 375-400*. Try to keep humidity out of your oven for better results!

Check out this video on how to keep your kitchen safe and clean!

Safety Tips for Red Bird Farms.  Follow some basic rules when handling raw chicken!

Refrigerator 

Store fresh chicken between 30-36.* This temperature will maximize shelf life and keep your chicken nice, juicy, and bacteria free.

Freezer

If you must freeze your Red Bird chicken, then be sure to remove the chicken from the tray pack and place into a plastic bag. The atmosphere in the tray packs has oxygen, so it will cause freezer burn.

Grocery bag on counter

Did you know that a large part of cross contamination occurs in reusable grocery bags? Make sure you clean your bags and also bag your raw meats separately from produce.

Cutting board

Use separate cutting boards for raw and cooked items. Also, be sure to have separate cutting boards for chicken, fish, meats and produce.

Plates

Keep separate plates for cooked and raw chicken.

Sink

Wash your hands often and thoroughly. 1 in 6 Americans get food poisoning each year, and much of that
illness can be avoided with proper hygiene. Wash your hands between handling different items, after using the restroom, and regularly throughout the cook process.

Knife 

Keep separate knives for separate items. Also, keep knives sharp. You’re less likely to slip and cut yourself with sharp knives (rather than dull). Keep your chicken cuts clean and safe.

HOW LONG CAN I KEEP A FRESH TURKEY IN THE FRIDGE?

The use or freeze by date on the turkey serves as a guideline.  Yet the temperature at which the turkey is stored will greatly affect shelf life.  Make sure your fridge is 36° F or cooler.  Also, the coolest place in a fridge is usually the bottom towards the back.  Keep your turkey in this cool place and it will stay fresh until the use/freeze by date on the label.  Try to avoid freezing a Red Bird turkey as it will be a little less juicy after it's been frozen.  Finally, we always recommend doing the "smell test" on ALL of your perishable goods...your nose knows best!

Did you freeze your turkey?  

Click on this link for some pointers on defrosting your turkey and safe shelf life practices for frozen meat!

For more information on food safety, please visit: http://www.foodsafety.org